Saturday, February 16, 2013

“Repairer of the breach, they shall call you, restorer of ruined homesteads.” (Isaiah 58: 18)

Isaiah is putting before the people the prospect of a glorious return to their country after the bitter Babylonian exile. However, this gift cannot be realized without human collaboration, which is the effort to renew their own behavior and take the road of reciprocal love and attention to sisters and brothers, the heart of an authentic relationship with God.

In fact, the nation is reduced to a rubble heap. The walls are crumbling, the streets impassable. They must roll up their sleeves and go to work without becoming discouraged by the difficulties.

It is a concrete image of a reality that is not only exterior. More than the city, it is God’s people who are dragging along. This is where a patient and timely labor of reconstruction is urgent.

‘Repair the breach’ means helping to re-discover their own citizenship. This task is urgent even today when many have lost sight their identity as citizens of an earthly city and they must be involved in building a society where all may live. They are also citizens of a country where Jesus has newly reopened the doors and indicated the road.

‘Restore the streets’ means re-establishing channels of communication and eliminating whatever prevents the encounter with others. In this way, the country may be populated by a people on a journey who are no longer lost like sheep without a shepherd.

This is not a fable or a fairy tale, but a reality to build. Lent calls to us unequivocally. We must repair the breach. We must restore the streets. As Christians, we are on the front lines and God wants us to learn how to cooperate so that the dream may become a reality.

Today in my pause for silent contemplation, I will ask Jesus how I can be a ‘repairer of breaches’ and a ‘restorer of roads’ in my daily life.


- Living Scripture